Google and Walmart are partnering on voice shopping in a challenge to Amazon’s Alexa

Google and Walmart have entered into a partnership to make hundreds of thousands of Walmart products available to purchase through the Google Home voice-controlled speaker, the tech giant’s answer to the Amazon Echo, the companies told Recode on Tuesday.

Owners of the Google Home gadget will be able to order one item at a time from Walmart completely by voice, or add multiples items to an online shopping cart for larger orders, and complete the purchase via the Google Home app later on.

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Over 500 Android apps with a combined 100 million downloads found to secretly contain spyware

Unbeknown to the app developers, an advertising software kit contained code for stealing data from their products’ users.

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More than 500 Android apps, collectively downloaded over 100 million times from the Google Play store, could have been used to secretly distribute spyware to users, thanks to a malicious advertising SDK (software development kit).

Mobile apps — especially free ones — commonly use advertising SDKs to deliver ads to their customers through existing advertising networks, thereby generating revenue.

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Android O is officially called Android Oreo

The latest version of Android is officially here, and it’s called Android Oreo, as most people suspected. Google made the interesting decision to reveal the final name and consumer launch details of Android 8.0 coincidentally with the arrival of the solar eclipse over NYC, which is where it held its launch livestream today.

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HTC cuts price of Vive virtual reality system by $200, could spur more enterprise pilots

HTC Vive now goes for $599 and the company may be speaking to enterprises as much as consumers.

HTC cut the price of its Vive virtual reality system by $200 in a move that follows discounting by Facebook’s Oculus Rift.

In a blog post, HTC said it would offer its Vive system for $599. That bundle includes headset, sensors and motion controllers. Oculus in July said that its Rift and Touch were available for $399 for a limited time. Both Oculus and HTC are chasing Sony’s Playstation VR, which has sold more than a million units so far and goes for $399.

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Apple just shared iOS 11 beta 7 to developers

Apple just dropped a brand new beta for iOS 11. And you know that iOS 11 is going to be your favorite major iOS update of the year, as there’s only one per year. The company has been testing iOS 11 for a couple of months already. Don’t forget that the beta program is primarily targeted at developers working on app updates.

I still wouldn’t recommend installing iOS 11 on the iPhone you use every day. The changes in iOS 11 will take some time to pay off for your iPhone anyway. And beta versions of iOS usually drain your battery life.

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Cisco rolls out industry-first security features for Spark

The collaboration platform will now, among other things, enable customers to run on-prem key servers for securing cloud content.

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Cisco on Monday is unveiling a set of new security features for its Spark platform that it says are unprecedented in the cloud collaboration space.

The new capabilities, years in the making, “set a new bar for enterprise-grade security for collaboration tools,” Cisco CTO Jonathan Rosenberg told ZDNet.

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Intel’s new 8th generation Core processors launch today with revised Kaby Lake chips

Intel might be sticking to the familiar Kaby Lake architecture for the eight generation of its Core chips, but the its internal testing looks pretty promising as far as performance goes. The company says the chips are capable of a 40-percent increase over their predecessors — and even more notable for those finally ready to upgrade an old system: about double the performance of a five year old device.

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Bitcoin wallet ‘Blockchain’ adds Ethereum support

This isn’t a game of bingo, the company called Blockchain is maintaining the world’s most popular bitcoin wallet. And starting today, Blockchain users will also be able to create Ethereum wallets and hold ethers.

Blockchain isn’t a centralized exchange like Coinbase or Kraken. It is simply a wallet so that you can safely story all your cryptocurrencies. Compared to many services out there, Blockchain is more secure and more difficult to hack.

When you create a Blockchain wallet on the web or using the mobile app, the company can’t see your balance or your transactions. You can back up your wallet to Blockchain’s servers, but you keep the keys to your wallet.

And this approach has been quite popular as there are now 16 million Blockchain wallets. The startup also recently raised a $40 million round.

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Samsung’s latest portable SSD can handle RAW 4K video

The T5 hits 540 MB/s thanks to 64-layer V-NAND and USB 3.1 gen 2 tech.

We keep hearing about obtuse terms like “96-layer” and “V-NAND” for flash storage tech, but what does that mean for actual products? Samsung has given us a concrete answer with its latest portable SSD drive, the T5. It uses bleeding-edge 64-layer V-NAND and USB 3.1 gen 2 tech to generate impressive 540 MB/s transfer speeds, assuming your host computer can handle it. That’s about as fast an external device of any kind that you can find right now.

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LinkedIn can’t block scrapers from monitoring user activity

It just lost a lawsuit that could have major implications for your social media data.

Your LinkedIn activity could soon be used to keep tabs on you at work. On Monday, a US federal judge ruled that the Microsoft-owned social network cannot block a startup from accessing public data. The company in question, hiQ Labs, scrapes LinkedIn info to create algorithms that can predict whether employees are likely to quit their jobs. The case could also have a wider impact on the control social media sites wield over your info.

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