Theresa May to launch wide-ranging internet regulation and security changes despite not winning majority

Theresa May looks set to launch wide-ranging internet regulation and plans to fundamentally change how technology works despite not having won a majority.

In the speech in which she committed to keep governing despite calls to stand down, the prime minister made reference to extending powers for the security services. Those powers – which include regulation of the internet and forcing internet companies to let spies read everyone’s private communications – were a key part of the Conservative campaign, which failed to score a majority in the House of Commons.

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Twitter won’t share tweets with law enforcement data hubs

Its partner Dataminr can’t contribute information to surveillance-friendly fusion centers in the US.

Twitter is still determined to avoid facilitating mass surveillance by spies and law enforcement. The company has told Dataminr, a firm it partly owns, to stop sharing tweets with the 77 law enforcement fusion centers (that is, data hubs where agencies share info and make connections) in the US. This doesn’t prevent police from sifting through Twitter posts, but it certainly makes their work harder. The centers won’t have ready access to “billions” of tweets they can pass on to the federal government for spying purposes, according to the ACLU.

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Facebook finds more exaggerated ad data

A self-audit has revealed flawed metrics, and the company is determined to fix them.

After Facebook realized that it had been overstating video views for years, it conducted an internal review to search for more flaws messing with its ad data… and it’s not happy with what it found. The social network reports that it found multiple problems with how it calculated or represented the info that marketers thrive on. It wasn’t always counting end-to-end video playback properly, for example, since clip lengths would occasionally change when you started streaming. Facebook also over-reported how long people spent reading Instant Articles, and included more clicks and views than it should in some dashboards.

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Budget US Android smartphones found secretly sending personal data to China

Commercial firmware pre-installed on some Android smartphone models sold in the US has been found to be secretly sending highly sensitive data to a third party company based in China, according to analysis by security firm Kryptowire.

Personal data being transmitted without users’ knowledge or consent included text messages, call logs, contacts, app usage data and even a user’s location.

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Trump surveillance fears could lift privacy tech in Europe

The full ramifications of Donald Trump being the next president of the United States of America will not be known for months — perhaps years. Given he’s a man of many conflicting words it’s near impossible to know which of his pledges and pronouncements he will keep or act upon, likely until his administration is up and running and showing its true colors.

Yet uncertainty can itself be a motivator — and the risk of an authoritarian leader as commander-in-chief of the US’ government’s mass surveillance apparatus has caused many to sound alarm bells already.

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Google buys Eyefluence eye-tracking startup

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Google want to know everywhere that you’re looking.

Today, Eyefluence announced that it has been acquired by Google. The eye-tracking interface startup founded in 2013 had raised $21.6M in funding from investors including Intel Capital, Jazz Venture Partners, Motorola Solutions Venture Capital and NHN Investment. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

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Cuba has been filtering texts containing political dissent

Text messages including ‘human rights’ and ‘hunger strike’ never reached their recipients.

Cuba’s struggles with modern telecommunications have been many. Now, it looks as though the Communist country has another problem on its hands: text message censorship. SMS sent with words including “human rights,” “hunger strike” and the name of dissident José Daniel Ferrer García aren’t reaching their intended recipients according to Reuters and Cuban blog 14ymedio (Spanish). The news came to light when some Cubans noticed they were being charged for messages that never were delivered.

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France, Germany push for access to encrypted messages after wave of terror attacks

But it conflicts with a recent review of EU privacy rules, which concluded that the use of encryption should be encouraged.

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France and Germany are to ask the EU for new powers that could see state intelligence agencies compel makers of mobile messaging services to turn over encrypted content.

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Romanian spies want to spot faces in a crowd – illegally, say human rights groups

Romania’s intelligence agency and local human-rights groups aren’t seeing eye to eye over a new facial recognition system that’s officially for fighting terrorism and tax evasion.

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